The sprawling growth of federal bureaucracy is a pretty common complaint. But U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock is going to try to explain how exactly it affects the bottom line of local residents and businesses.


The sprawling growth of federal bureaucracy is a pretty common complaint. But U.S. Rep. Aaron Schock is going to try to explain how exactly it affects the bottom line of local residents and businesses.
 
The Peoria Republican said Monday that he'll begin to speak out at a news conference Tuesday, "going in and highlighting cause and effect in my district" on what some of those burdensome regulations mean.

His chief example was of the now-rejected rule that the Department of Labor had been preparing to implement that would have restricted the right of minors to do any work on their family farms - something Schock said incensed area farmers.

The rule was withdrawn last week after a growing swell of protest.

Schock cited another example, a Department of Labor requirement that to be compliant with the Americans With Disabilities Act - now on the books for two decades - all public swimming pools had to be equipped with a mechanized chair lift before the end of March.

"This is a $15,000 piece of equipment," Schock said, which in his opinion creates more liability concerns - and potential danger or distraction to regular swimmers - than it does benefits in most cases.

He said many local pools ended up making the purchase before the regulation was pulled back just days before the deadline.

"There's one of these things coming out every day," Schock said.

Piled on top of a down economy, a growing national debt and a tax system in need of reform, "all of this adds up to a stagnation," he said. "It adds up to limited risk-taking and investment."

He plans to detail more examples at a news conference this morning at his congressional office.