A Morton man, Lyle D. Falk, 46, has been arrested and charged with one count each of receipt and distribution of child pornography. Falk, of the 300 block of North Oklahoma Ave., made his initial appearance in federal court Monday. Falk was ordered to remain detained in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service pending a detention hearing scheduled at 10:30 a.m. June 28 before U.S. Magistrate Judge John A. Gorman in Peoria.


A Morton man, Lyle D. Falk, 46, has been arrested and charged with one count each of receipt and distribution of child pornography. Falk, of the 300 block of North Oklahoma Ave., made his initial appearance in federal court Monday. Falk was ordered to remain detained in the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service pending a detention hearing scheduled at 10:30 a.m. June 28 before U.S. Magistrate Judge John A. Gorman in Peoria.

The indictment, returned by the grand jury June 20, alleges that on or about Jan. 18 Falk distributed images of child pornography via the Internet. The indictment further alleges that in October 2011, Falk received images of child pornography by computer and using the Internet. The indictment seeks forfeiture of a computer and hard drive allegedly used to commit or promote the offenses.

Trial is scheduled on Aug. 27 before Senior U.S. District Judge Joe Billy McDade.

The charges were investigated by the U.S. Secret Service, the Washington Police Department and the Bloomington Police Department. The case is being prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Kirk D. Schoenbein.

If convicted, the statutory penalty for both offenses, distribution of child pornography and receipt of child pornography, is a mandatory minimum five years to 20 years in prison and a term of supervised release of up to life following any term of imprisonment. If a defendant has a prior child sex abuse or child pornography conviction, the statutory penalty is not less than 15 years and up to 40 years in prison.

Members of the public are reminded that an indictment is merely an accusation; the defendant is presumed innocent unless proven guilty.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice. Led by U.S. Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet as well as to identify and rescue victims.

For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.