Good morning, troops. It's Wednesday, Feb. 27.

Brad Rebman has been Metamora police chief for more than a month, but it doesn't appear he's quite settled in yet.

"We've got some work to do ahead of us just to organize things the way I feel would make it better," Rebman said. "Things could be a lot worse."

In some estimations, things might be a lot better in the department than they were a few months ago. Or at least less tumultuous.

During its meeting Jan. 17, the Village Board approved Rebman's appointment as police chief. He began work the following day, according to Village President Ken Maurer, who appointed Rebman.

A former Woodford County Sheriff's Office deputy, Rebman was hired to replace longtime Metamora Chief Mike Todd. The Village Board fired Todd in December.

Village officials had lost confidence in Todd, according to Maurer, who didn't elaborate beyond that. He did suggest issues with Todd had been ongoing.

Rebman, 43, suggested lingering Todd-related issues still might be affecting the department.

"It has been as smooth as it can be while still trying to deal with some of the residuals from when Mike was here," Rebman said. "Mike and I personally got along very well. I don't have anything negative to say about Mike.

"Just some things are going to be done differently now that he's not here and I'm here."

A Rushville native, Rebman worked in the sheriff's office almost 22 years. His most recent duty was providing security for judges in the county courthouse. Rebman also was an animal-control warden, a patrolman, a sergeant and a detective.

Rebman's wife is from Metamora, and their family lives near the village.

"I pretty much have considered this my hometown my adult life," Rebman said. "I think I can offer a lot of the things I've learned from the sheriff's department and bring them to Metamora. Not that this place is a bad place, but I think I can improve it."

Competence is among the reasons Rebman was hired, according to Maurer. He referred to his criteria as "the three C's," with competence the second one.

The first "C" is character: "If a candidate does not have this, we do not want him or her," Maurer stated.

"The third 'C' is for chemistry — how well will the candidate fit with our staff, Village Board, citizens and our small village."

The police-chief opening attracted 21 applicants, according to Maurer. There were three finalists interviewed.

Rebman hopes the Metamora populace will like his department's approach under his supervision.

"I don't want us to be looked upon as our main goal is to write (traffic) tickets," he said. "I don't believe in that kind of policing. I believe in community policing and us being public servants."

The song heard on the way to work is performed by a guitar god who is the most recent old rocker to announce a farewell tour. But his reasons are legit and unfortunate. We'll never forget the long, flowing hair, Pete.